Cool Links #107: Strep Throat Final Day

My son had strep throat and the Dr. wouldn’t let him go back to school until tomorrow.  So today is my day for parent duty – so no school.  The yearbook is finally done, except the supplement and I can finally get a post out.  It has been more than a month since my last post.  Wow, that’s bad.  I do have a lot of links though.

1 – Thanks to the Principal’s Page for this photo “What we see, what the kids see.”  Funny.

2 – British photographer Horace Winters gives us a visual record of what the world of Charles Dickens was like.  Courtesy of the blog Spitalfields Life, these photos could be used in history class, British Lit. or journalism.  They are a great record of what most of us can only imagine from reading Nicolas Nicklesby or any other Dickens classic.

East End Nippers

East End Nippers

3 – As a teacher of both journalism and history, I’ve always been fascinated by the stories from the US Civil War and WWI of the Christmas truces.  Many times, these tales tell of swapping common, but well liked items from one side, for what seems like better items from the other side – southern tobacco for northern coffee, etc.  But also of singing common hymns like Silent Night, and then on Dec. 26, a return to the shooting.  Thanks to Iconic Photos for the picture.

Christmas Truce

Christmas Truce

4 – Make Use Of has a Simple Guide to How The Internet Works in PDF format.  Great for teaching students the basics of the internet.

5 – Here’s a great way to do first time assignments for MMJs doing a one-man-band assignment, thanks Bob Kaplitz blog.

6 – I think I’ve featured this before – Cueprompter – it is a free online teleprompter that works pretty good.

7 – I’m excited about the upcoming film – The Bang Bang Club about a group of photographers, including Pulitzer winner Kevin Carter.  Thanks PetaPixel blog.

8 – Now this is punny.

Punny

Punny

9 – Silber Studios have some super color photos from Frank Hurley, the photographer who accompanied Ernest Shackleton to Antarctica, but failed to reach the South Pole.  The site discusses the difficulty in taking photos on the journey, never mind color ones.

Early Color Photos from Antarctica

Early Color Photos from Antarctica

10 – Here’s another iconic photo from the blog of the same name – The End of the Thousand Year Reich, taken by the incredible Margaret Bourke-White.  She saw and took photos of so many incredible things during her career and this suicide photo was just one more to add to the list.  Read the whole post for the rich details about the photo and the end of WWII and the many suicides of Nazi party faithful.

End of the German Reich

End of the German Reich

11 – No Cool Links would be complete without a post from the DPs, Digital Photography School.  Every photojournalist needs to be able to shoot a decent portrait.  Here are 10 Techniques for better portraits.

12 – Photographer Sean Armenta is a photoshop wizard and his tutorials on the Pen Tool and Healing Brush are great.  Here’s his new one on the Clone Stamp Tool.  Thanks PetaPixel and F/Stoppers.

13 – Pro Photographer Mike Olivella has a great YouTube channel where he shows off his techniques for shooting NCAA sports.  Here’s his tips on Football.

14 – I guess this is the photography post – here’s a video on Vimeo about what it is like to be a photographer in the Obama White House.

15 – Here’s a little gem – a video about making a book using hot lead presses.

16 – What would happen if you used your camera for the first time?  Funny video.

17 – The Lenslinger really says it all in this “open letter.” You can’t just be a writer or reporter or a photographer any more.  You really must be able to do it all and do it well.  You can’t be lazy and you better be good at what you do – or you will be gone.

18 – Want a graphical timeline of computers from 1939 to 2010?

I’ve got tons more links, but I want to try to get back to a once a week schedule and publish again this coming weekend.  Hope to see you then.

 

Cool Links #106: The One Where We Can See It From Here

In education right now, it is not the end of the world.  But we can see it from here.  In Texas, they are talking about cuts to everything, even football if you can believe it.  That’s how you know it’s the end of the world.  If it is education, then they are looking to cut it back – cost wise, yet “provide the same high level of quality.”  As P.T. Barnum once said (or didn’t) “There’s a sucker born every minute.”  OK, enough soap boxing – let’s move on to the links.

Education Cuts

Education Cuts

1 – Thanks to PetaPixel for this video about an animal photography close encounter.

2 – PetaPixel was full of great stuff this last week or so, I love this shot.  Cameras that are well used.  Thank goodness our cameras are usually not in this bad of shape.

Dirty Cameras

Dirty Cameras

3 – And finally from PP again, an interesting mashup of computing power and photography – the “average” face of a woman in 40 countries.  Not sure how they did this, but it is interesting.

4 – Former Guardian editor Tim Radford has 25 commandments for journalist.  They are superb – my favortite:  10. So here is a rule. A story will only ever say one big thing. AND 20. English is better than Latin. You don’t exterminate, you kill. You don’t salivate, you drool. You don’t conflagrate, you burn.

5 – As a photojournalist, you can’t not know about the Afghan girl with the amazing green eyes.  This is a short (52 min.) video about the search to find her again after the liberation of her country.

6 – The 10,000 Words Blog has a collection of new Valentines cards for journalists.  Fun.

5 W's and H

5 W's and H

7 – Gizmodo is a tech blog, so it is interesting when they have an article about photography and sports photography at that – how to shoot football.  Good stuff.

8 – In  a related post, Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay quarterback owes photographer Scott Kelby a monopod.

9 – And again – football, Silber Studios; how to set your camera up for action.

10 –  I discovered a great blog called Everything is Remix.  There are two great videos on the site, Part 1 and Part 2 about the Remix Culture and why it is a good thing.

11 – I have to agree in principle with The Innovative Educator, except that it is a Race To the Bottom.

12 – All media professionals need a web site and that means buying a domain name and getting web hosting.

Well, that’s all for today.  Have a great week.

Cool Links #105: The One About A Long List

I haven’t done a links post in so long I think people have aged since then.  Sorry, but all you yearbook teachers out there understand – this is the crazy season.  Lots of deadlines from now until we finish.  The walking dead are yearbook teachers without enough coffee – real zombies.   So here are some links…

1 – This one is super cool, data – journalism – education – interactive all rolled into one.  The interactive map of ROI on education.  Just check it out, my school district was actually lime green.

2 – The terrific Bob Kaplitz blog has a graphic with the four levels of story-telling.  Very useful, I’m going to share it with my broadcast journalism kids.  Maybe we can move past level 2.

3 – Here’s a sad graphic.  Educators one of the five worst paid jobs with a degree.

4  – The Daily Grind has a response from the trenches to President Obama’s remarks in the SOTU about education.  Worth reading.

5  – This is funny, and yet true in its own way.  Follows the baffle ‘em with BS theory.

6 – Some of us are old enough to remember black screens with green letters and punch cards.  Our smart phones and iPads are nearly proof that we live in the future.  Ars Technica has a lengthy, but good article about the evolution of computer screens.

7 – Thanks to PetaPixel – this is really cool.  They found someone who still shoots old fashioned Ambrosetypes (similar to Daguerrotypes).

8 – This could be my student’s motto:  From Overheard in the Newsroom.

9 – OK, I’ve never heard of useit.com before, but I’ve heard of nearly all the ideas in this article before.  They just packaged it all together in one spot.  They restate what I’ve heard of people who read on the web and what is known about scanning.  This is why journalists must get back to basics on the inverted pyramid and headline writing.

10 – This is great!

Photoshop CS4 Cream

Photoshop CS4 Cream

11 – Thanks to Bellringers for a series of professional development sessions we’d all really love to see.

12 – We have to stop forcing boys (and some girls) into the box of the “good student.”  I learned so much from my own son and two former students from my broadcast journalism class.  All of these students are the get up and go kind of people.  They can’t stand to be sitting down – unless they are playing a video game, musical instrument, etc.  They have to be active.  We can’t keep forcing passive learning on them.

13 – I still think this kind of photo-retouching is wrong.  People used to smoke – everyone knows that.  I don’t think Churchill will make a kid want to take up the cigar.

14 – My students do this all the time…

Stop Printing

Stop Printing

15 – These kids from Quebec have no idea what a record player is for, or an 8-track.  How long until iPods are obsolete?

16 – Maybe if more journalists acted like this, there’d be more readers/viewers/visitors – see Overheard in the Newsroom.

I think I may post again tomorrow.  Getting sleepy – still got lots of links in the hopper.

 

YLYB #95-96: We’re Baaaaack

This is the second day back with students and I’ve already missed a day of blogging.  I guess I just have to get back in the habit.  Like anything else, it takes practice.  We are really into the big mess of deadlines in the middle part of the year.  The kids are already feeling the stress, but it just seems like we are note making enough progress.  Things are slowly turning around.  But too slowly.

Oh and on the first day, the backup NAS storage drive gave me a scare.  I couldn’t get it to mount.  It seems the IP number changed.  Oh my…

Cool Links #104: The One During The “Universal Holiday” Break

I heard this on Disney Channel the other day – Happy Universal Holiday.  We have now officially crossed over into the world of Big Corporate and 1984.  It is amazingly sad how newspeak is taking over our language.  When I read the book 1984, in 1984 I never thought it would come to pass.  But now I live in that world.  So, let’s use the interwebs to find something to take our mind off of it all and be better j-teachers after the break.  Here come the links -

1 –  There doesn’t seem to be a way to add xtranormal movies to my wordpress blog, but I can link to them. Here’s a funny one about a young comm. grad who wants to be a big TV news star.

2 – The Principal’s Page has a funny about schools taking the blame for what happens at home.

3 – As journalists and educators, we should be very interested in “What is the best question in the world?”

4 – This is how e-textbooks are created.

5 – If you are a blogger, and you should be, then you should back it up!  FreeTech4Teachers will show you how.  Just backed up mine.

6 – Seen a number of Year in Photos around the web for 2010 – Denver Post, Boston Globe,

7 – My school district recently set up a moodle server and I use it nearly every day.  I love it.  Here’s a chart with the pros/cons of moodle.

8 – If you teach broadcast journalism, then you must watch and subscribe to Austin’s Josh Hinkle who has posted some great videos about what life is like as a solo-mojo on the go in Austin, TX at KXAN.  Thanks Josh.

9 – This post from WDL has a useful Photoshop keyboard shortcut desktop pattern and a color wheel sheet (printable).

10 – WDL has been hitting it with useful posts lately.  Here’s on on apostrophe and quote marks – you are not doing it right.

11 – New Term – PHObar:  Photoshopped Beyond All Recognition.

PHObar

PHObar

12 – Google has a new YouTube channel called Teach My Parents Tech.  It really should be Teach Tech to Anyone, but anyway – it is useful for teaching simple tech tips to people.  Here’s an example

13 – Since I live in Houston, I’ve been following the story of Lamar High School’s library closely and the early stories about it were dead wrong – no books burned, only 20 year old books trashed, 11,000 books kept, nearly 90 laptops for use in the library, not 20, etc.  The Innovative Educator has valuable post on the subject.

14 – As a photo/video-grapher you will have to deal with wet weather if you shoot outdoor sports.  Clifford Oto has a picture perfect post about his dealings with rain this football season.

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

15 – Rick Sammon is the online guru of photo.  This post is simply about one thing – GET CLOSE!

Get Closer

Get Closer

16 – Why do all “curriculum planners” act like this?  It seems like everyone has met at least one curriculum planner who has zero knowledge of actual teaching.

Have a great “universal holiday” break.

YLYB #78: Back it Up, Or Cry

I bought two brand new 1.5 TB network drives earlier this year.  They let multiple users share data – like a mini LAN.  We keep all of our yearbook files on these drives.  Well, actually, we hadn’t moved them over yet.  They are still on the old 1 TB drive, with no backup.  This morning, the drive did not want to start up after it’s Thanksgiving rest.  I was panicing.  After two startups, it did boot and I immediately made a backup.  So, tomorrow, is moving day.  All data will go to new drive number uno, and drive dos will be the backup.  Scary.

YLYB #76: Keep it Organized

I started out the year with good intentions.  This is the smallest yearbook staff I’ve had in several years, and they are also inexperienced too.  So, that means we have to think smarter, not work harder.  So, I had a plan to use Adobe Bridge to organize our photo library.

It was working well until October.  The month of craziness.  It all fell apart, but now that the football season is over, we are working hard to get the photo library tags cooking again.  This is so helpful when you need to find a good photo of a cheerleader or an athletic trainer.  I hope to have all the tags going by tomorrow.

Cool Links #102: The One About…Wow Has It Been A Month

I have not been able or had enough energy to post a links post in more than a month.  My bad, as the kids say.  I think, with football season over, they will come out with more regularity.  Here’s the backlog of links.

1 – This photo must have hit with the emotional punch of the 9/11 Towers.  Sure England was a nation already at war when the Blitz hit, but the bombing of their capitol had to come as a surprise to most Londoners.

 

The Blitz

The Blitz

 

2 – The Newsosaur says that Deadlines Don’t Matter, and for a print product I would agree.  But you must own local and you must be online first and more importantly you better get it right.

3 – Here’s a tool that you can use for a lesson, LIFE Magazine’s Timeline creator.  I think you could come up with topics for students to create timelines of famous photos from the archives.   (Thanks to FreeTech4Teachers)

4 – This is a great graphic of movies about high school.  It is however, missing Never Been Kissed – best high school movie about journalism.

 

High School Movies List

High School Movies List

 

5 – The Digital Photography School dPs has a super useful post about how to use your zoom lens for composition rather than just to get closer.

6 – I’m pretty sure I first saw this on the Principal’s Page blog, but it is a great comic about this movie that makes it look so easy to turn around schools by just turning them over to the “supermen” at charter schools.

7 – Photojojo has a few tools for telling if a photo has been faked.  Worth checking out.

8 – Petapixel blog has a copy of the first ever digital photo – not from a digital camera, but from a scanner in 1975.

9 – The Web Design Ledger has a couple of useful digital photography “cheat sheets”.  This one has a good f/stop, shutter, ISO diagram (pdf).

10 – I know a lot of video shooters don’t know a monopod from a broken tripod leg, but I think as many shooters become one-man-bands, they are going to get to know the value of a good monopod.

11 – I am a big Mac fanboy, but I do know how to use a Windows PC.  But I still wouldn’t trade the ease of use and tight integration of my Mac for desktop publishing, video editing or web design.  Windows 7 is pretty good, but you are still at the mercy of the hardware makers.  I still think Mac hardware is still the best, Natania Barron does not agree.

12 – OMG, I have already shared this video with my photojournalism class.  Next year, it will be day one.  They were very quiet.  Thanks to the Reynolds Institute.

13 – Posted without comment.

 

Privacy - Not Found on the Net

Privacy - Not Found on the Net

 

14 – If you didn’t know, or had forgotten like I had, Ansel Adams also took some important photos that documented the tragedy of Japanese internment at the Manzanar center.  Just check it out.

15 – The yearbook blog has 15 Terms every yearbook student should know.  I agree.

16 – Most of the famous photos I’ve shared are US centric, but this is also an important moment for journalism – L’Affaire Dreyfus and journalist Emile Zola.  He stood up for a Jewish army officer in the French army accused of treason.  Anti-Semitism was just as bad in France as in Germany.  There is a great movie with Richard Dreyfus in it called Prisoner of Honor.

 

L'Affaire Dreyfuss

L'Affaire Dreyfuss

Have a good week.

 

 

Cool Links #101: The One About Rest For The Weary

I really enjoyed taking a nap both yesterday and again today.  Neither were scheduled, I just felt very tired and then took a nap.  I was really tired after a week of homecoming activities.  So, now I’m fairly refreshed and here are the links.

1 – I found this short video about making printer’s ink from Speaking Yearbook.  It’s a little bit dull for my yearbook kids, but it added to my knowledge base.

2 – The Library of Congress has a great timeline of copyright law on their website with other teaching materials too.  They should know, since copyright law falls under their jurisdiction.

3 – Five Tips From A Newsman on Getting Better Event Photographs.  This one hits on all five.

4 – What’s The Best Internet Browser?  – Google Chrome of course!  Here’s Why.

5 – The Introduction to Web Usability is a super easy to use, easy to read resource on both How and Why you should create navigation and other elements in specific ways on the web.  It is a free PDF book.  Download it today.

I know it is a short list this week, but some weeks you just don’t catch many fish.

 

 

YLYB #41: You Can Never Train Enough

OK, training, workshops and yearbook prep can get boring in big gulps.  But in small doses, I am always up for another yearbook workshop – especially for InDesign or Photoshop.

Today I attended both in one.  The workshop was sponsored by my publisher and was run by the most excellent Hal Schmidt, Hal is your Pal.  Hal has been a friend since my Pagemaker days.  Yes, that long.  He is the guru of geekdom and the prince of software.  He asked me if I was going to be bored, because it was mostly basics.

I told him, that I would learn at least one new thing.  I was right. I learned a bunch of new, or at least different ways to do old things.  I have enough material on my laptop for at least five new powerpoint presentations.  I promise to post it here when they are done.

So, the four hours of Saturday training were worth it!

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