Cool Links #108: Promises, Promises

I know.  I promised to post more often.  I’m trying to keep that promise.  Here come the links.

1 – I saw this graphic and thought of the number of times I was searching for something like, “How to Write A Broadcast News Story.”  Try it, you’ll be deep in the google results before you find something remotely useful.

Deep In The Googleplex

Deep In The Googleplex

2 – YouTube has a fairly good resource called the Copyright Center.  It is focused on video, but has some good videos about remix culture, educational use and fair use.  And of course they have several good videos about copyright that would be useful in the classroom.

3 – Ever wanted to clean your lens the right way?  Nikon has a lengthy video with a how to do it the right way.

4 – As a web designer, I find this funny.

Go Web Go!

Go Web Go!

5 – This is also true, and I tell my broadcast kids this all the time.  No one else thinks your voice sounds weird.

Does my voice sound funny, or am I sucking down helium?

Does my voice sound funny, or am I sucking down helium?

6 – I really like the Iconic Photos web site.  It is a combination of my two favorite subjects History and Journalism.  This photo of Pope John-Paul II’s assassination attempt affected billions of Catholics and others world wide.  The site also provides great in-depth information about the photos, it is terrific.

Pope John Paul II

Pope John Paul II

7 – Do your photographers want to make a living after they leave your classroom, then they must have all five of these key skills for a 21st Century photog – thanks dPs.

8 – Bill Mecca has a video that answers the question:  How long should you leave graphics on the screen? My answer is usually long enough to read it out loud at a normal pace.

9 – HTML 5 is all the rage it seems.  But why bother learning it, when HTML 4 works just fine.  WDL has an entire post devoted to that answer, but here are the bullet points:

  • HTML5 will load much quicker than its older brother because it implements WebSockets.
  • Mobile phone applications will be much more accessible if written in HTML5 because you will not have to write applications for a specific brand of phone but rather can create universal applications for all phones.
  • You have more flexibility in creating your website.
  • Video, audio and images are all easily written right into the code, eliminating the need for any third party software.
  • This language is growing and will only result in more, new, better and faster features that will leave old websites looking outdated.
  • HTML5 simply builds on HTML4, so the old markup can stay in place as you develop the new features.
  • HTML5 and CSS3 together will give you some serious designer credibility.
10 – This is a great behind the scenes video of how they shoot the Super Bowl for Sports Illustrated.
11 – I love this quick way to teach sports photography “two faces and a ball.”  It’s just that simple.
12 – How magical this must have been.  Kids today don’t understand that we used to have to wait to get our pictures back.  Not Polaroids.
You Don't Have To Wait

You Don't Have To Wait

13 – How do you tell a story?  Good question.  Campfire Journalism has a post with three different answers.  Thanks.

Until next week.  Keep the faith.

Cool Links #107: Strep Throat Final Day

My son had strep throat and the Dr. wouldn’t let him go back to school until tomorrow.  So today is my day for parent duty – so no school.  The yearbook is finally done, except the supplement and I can finally get a post out.  It has been more than a month since my last post.  Wow, that’s bad.  I do have a lot of links though.

1 – Thanks to the Principal’s Page for this photo “What we see, what the kids see.”  Funny.

2 – British photographer Horace Winters gives us a visual record of what the world of Charles Dickens was like.  Courtesy of the blog Spitalfields Life, these photos could be used in history class, British Lit. or journalism.  They are a great record of what most of us can only imagine from reading Nicolas Nicklesby or any other Dickens classic.

East End Nippers

East End Nippers

3 – As a teacher of both journalism and history, I’ve always been fascinated by the stories from the US Civil War and WWI of the Christmas truces.  Many times, these tales tell of swapping common, but well liked items from one side, for what seems like better items from the other side – southern tobacco for northern coffee, etc.  But also of singing common hymns like Silent Night, and then on Dec. 26, a return to the shooting.  Thanks to Iconic Photos for the picture.

Christmas Truce

Christmas Truce

4 – Make Use Of has a Simple Guide to How The Internet Works in PDF format.  Great for teaching students the basics of the internet.

5 – Here’s a great way to do first time assignments for MMJs doing a one-man-band assignment, thanks Bob Kaplitz blog.

6 – I think I’ve featured this before – Cueprompter – it is a free online teleprompter that works pretty good.

7 – I’m excited about the upcoming film – The Bang Bang Club about a group of photographers, including Pulitzer winner Kevin Carter.  Thanks PetaPixel blog.

8 – Now this is punny.

Punny

Punny

9 – Silber Studios have some super color photos from Frank Hurley, the photographer who accompanied Ernest Shackleton to Antarctica, but failed to reach the South Pole.  The site discusses the difficulty in taking photos on the journey, never mind color ones.

Early Color Photos from Antarctica

Early Color Photos from Antarctica

10 – Here’s another iconic photo from the blog of the same name – The End of the Thousand Year Reich, taken by the incredible Margaret Bourke-White.  She saw and took photos of so many incredible things during her career and this suicide photo was just one more to add to the list.  Read the whole post for the rich details about the photo and the end of WWII and the many suicides of Nazi party faithful.

End of the German Reich

End of the German Reich

11 – No Cool Links would be complete without a post from the DPs, Digital Photography School.  Every photojournalist needs to be able to shoot a decent portrait.  Here are 10 Techniques for better portraits.

12 – Photographer Sean Armenta is a photoshop wizard and his tutorials on the Pen Tool and Healing Brush are great.  Here’s his new one on the Clone Stamp Tool.  Thanks PetaPixel and F/Stoppers.

13 – Pro Photographer Mike Olivella has a great YouTube channel where he shows off his techniques for shooting NCAA sports.  Here’s his tips on Football.

14 – I guess this is the photography post – here’s a video on Vimeo about what it is like to be a photographer in the Obama White House.

15 – Here’s a little gem – a video about making a book using hot lead presses.

16 – What would happen if you used your camera for the first time?  Funny video.

17 – The Lenslinger really says it all in this “open letter.” You can’t just be a writer or reporter or a photographer any more.  You really must be able to do it all and do it well.  You can’t be lazy and you better be good at what you do – or you will be gone.

18 – Want a graphical timeline of computers from 1939 to 2010?

I’ve got tons more links, but I want to try to get back to a once a week schedule and publish again this coming weekend.  Hope to see you then.

 

Cool Links #104: The One During The “Universal Holiday” Break

I heard this on Disney Channel the other day – Happy Universal Holiday.  We have now officially crossed over into the world of Big Corporate and 1984.  It is amazingly sad how newspeak is taking over our language.  When I read the book 1984, in 1984 I never thought it would come to pass.  But now I live in that world.  So, let’s use the interwebs to find something to take our mind off of it all and be better j-teachers after the break.  Here come the links -

1 –  There doesn’t seem to be a way to add xtranormal movies to my wordpress blog, but I can link to them. Here’s a funny one about a young comm. grad who wants to be a big TV news star.

2 – The Principal’s Page has a funny about schools taking the blame for what happens at home.

3 – As journalists and educators, we should be very interested in “What is the best question in the world?”

4 – This is how e-textbooks are created.

5 – If you are a blogger, and you should be, then you should back it up!  FreeTech4Teachers will show you how.  Just backed up mine.

6 – Seen a number of Year in Photos around the web for 2010 – Denver Post, Boston Globe,

7 – My school district recently set up a moodle server and I use it nearly every day.  I love it.  Here’s a chart with the pros/cons of moodle.

8 – If you teach broadcast journalism, then you must watch and subscribe to Austin’s Josh Hinkle who has posted some great videos about what life is like as a solo-mojo on the go in Austin, TX at KXAN.  Thanks Josh.

9 – This post from WDL has a useful Photoshop keyboard shortcut desktop pattern and a color wheel sheet (printable).

10 – WDL has been hitting it with useful posts lately.  Here’s on on apostrophe and quote marks – you are not doing it right.

11 – New Term – PHObar:  Photoshopped Beyond All Recognition.

PHObar

PHObar

12 – Google has a new YouTube channel called Teach My Parents Tech.  It really should be Teach Tech to Anyone, but anyway – it is useful for teaching simple tech tips to people.  Here’s an example

13 – Since I live in Houston, I’ve been following the story of Lamar High School’s library closely and the early stories about it were dead wrong – no books burned, only 20 year old books trashed, 11,000 books kept, nearly 90 laptops for use in the library, not 20, etc.  The Innovative Educator has valuable post on the subject.

14 – As a photo/video-grapher you will have to deal with wet weather if you shoot outdoor sports.  Clifford Oto has a picture perfect post about his dealings with rain this football season.

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

15 – Rick Sammon is the online guru of photo.  This post is simply about one thing – GET CLOSE!

Get Closer

Get Closer

16 – Why do all “curriculum planners” act like this?  It seems like everyone has met at least one curriculum planner who has zero knowledge of actual teaching.

Have a great “universal holiday” break.

Cool Links #95: The One About Redoing Curriculum

About two months before school ended for me, I got a comment on my blog.  It said that Windows users could not access my Power Point presentations (.ppt files) because the embedded images were broken.  She asked me if I could post my photo lessons as PDF files.  I made a half-hearted promise to try to do so this summer.  Well, it’s summer…

And I’m trying to make good on my promise.  I have redone and reposted both the PPT and PDF files for about 15 of my lessons so far in the photojournalism syllabus.  But I am also trying to revamp my broadcasting and yearbook syllabi too.  So keep checking back, because I hope to post a few lessons every week until the summer is gone.  Now, the links…

1 – I have a lesson I teach about Paparazzi each year and one of the most famous is Ron Galella and most notoriously for this photo of Jackie Kennedy Onasis.  I’m definitely adding this to my Photos That Changed Journalism.  I’m also adding the blog – iconicphotos to my RSS reader.

Windblown Jackie by Ron Galella

Windblown Jackie by Ron Galella

2 – Photojojo has a list of the Top 50 Movies about Photographers.  I think it is a good list, but it is missing The Killing Fields – a great movie.

3 – Black Star Rising has a great post that states that Photo Manipulation is Not a Sin, but Lying About It Is.  I have to agree.  Just put photo illustration created in Photoshop on photos that are manipulated.

4 – I have seen this site listed on several blogs lately.  So, I had to see Who Do I Write Like? Well, I am not surprised to find out that…

I Write Like Stephen King

I Write Like Stephen King

5 – Free Tech 4 Teachers strikes gold again this week with not one, but two PDF photography texts.  They are not school textbooks, but they could be.  There is not a state adopted text for photojournalism and so I don’t have one, but I really like The Absolut Beginngers Guide To Photography.

6 – Here’s a fun game of Type Recognition.  Ten Magazine typefaces, how many can you recognize – I got six.

7 – Zombie Journalism is another new favorite blog for my RSS reader.  I love their 10 Social Media Guidelines for Journalists, especially number Five – Always remember: The Internet is public and permanent.

8 – Bill Mecca has episode 8 of his Quick Tips – this one is about improving your sound quality.

9 – All Web Design Blog helps to explain and demystify sending Clipping Paths using Photoshop.

Short list this week, but it is still summer.  Enjoy yourselves while it lasts.

Cool Links #87: The One About Prom Craziness

Last night was Prom.  Yesterday was insanity day.  We had our seniors out most of the day to get ready for Prom.  Some of the sophomores were at a Field Day, the Ballet Folklorico dance team was performing somewhere, there were AP Tests, and we were getting ready to prep for Yearbook Day!  Too much craziness for one day.  So, after another 16-hour day, it was time to sleep.  Now, it is time for cool links!

1 – As a yearbook advisor, I’m always on the lookout for a way to sell more yearbooks.  I think I may have found an advantage.  According to businesspundit.com, women make 70 percent of consumer purchases.  That is not a typo – 70 percent.  So, even though they are about 52 percent of your student body, the girls or the moms will make the decision to buy most of your yearbooks.  This may explain why girls dominate yearbook staffs.  Yearbooks are a consumer purchase.  They’re just more into it.

Women Make 70 Percent of Consumer Purchases

Women Make 70 Percent of Consumer Purchases

2 – If you teach video production or broadcast journalism, then you know how difficult it can be to get cutaways or b-roll.  Then you’ve got to watch this video. (mildly not safe for school)

3 – Is journalism about access?  In some ways it seems that the only journalism making any money these days (business, sports, entertainment) is about access.  Adam Westbrook takes this debate up with a piece on his blog.

4 – I love PHDcomics.com and this one is spot on.

Things You'll Never See In A Newspaper

Things You'll Never See In A Newspaper

5 – The JEA has a good presentation about the reasons why students should think internet publishing first.

6 – With Youtube changing from FLV to HTML5 on their site, I need a new way to download Youtube videos to use in class.  I prefer to use the Google Chrome browser, but you will need to download Firefox for this one, the Easy YouTube Video Downloader.  It works pretty good and lets you choose several formats to save your videos in.

7 – Dateline: Silver Age is an homage to both the “Silver” Age of Comics and to the many journalists who have had to pen a headline in a newspaper.  I love the site, it is so much fun.

Police Baffled By Newspaper Headlines

Police Baffled By Newspaper Headlines

8 – When you are creating a web site, you need that site to run in a lot of places.  I’m not talking about Denver and Boston, but Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Explorer.  And you need it to run on mobile devices too.  Noupe.com has a terrific list of sites that can help you optimize your web site for every type of browser and platform.

9 – I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned it before, but the SnapFactory Blog has some great tutorials, called Digital Photography 1-on-1.  They are for beginning and intermediate photographers.  They are available on their Youtube channel too.

10 – Want a simple way to develop grid-based web design systems?  Webdesignledger has everything you need – tons of links for grid based web design tools.  And who doesn’t like to design on a grid?

11 – Wired Magazine is stepping up for fair use.  In an online article, they note a study that says Fair Use of copyright material adds nearly $7 Trillion to the US economy alone.  So, I wonder just how much damage has the DMCA done to our economy?

12 – Where do computer threats come from?  You’d be surprised.

Where Computer Threats Come From

Where Computer Threats Come From

13 – Just funny.

Hall Monitor

Hall Monitor

14 – I’m a big fan of Rebooting The News, which comes from the author of Scripting The News.  I love his idea of creating three simple rules for computer standards that are similar to the rules for robotics by Isaac Asimov.

Have a great Yearbook Week and I hope you get your books in soon or finish your Fall books soon.

Cool Links #82: The One Where Global Warming Made Us Colder

OK, I’m just a journalist and so not qualified to comment on weighty scientific topics like global warming, but here in Houston, we’ve had the sixth coldest winter on record.  And we were just feeling spring-like and now it is feeling positively wintery again.  So, as long as it’s cold outside, we might as well fire up the computers and read some cool links.

1 – As the proud owner of a new Mac lab, I sometimes forget that most of the world uses an operating system from Redmond, Washington (Windows).  So, for those who might have a new Mac or end up teaching in a school with a Mac Lab – here’s a great site for learning all things newby Mac users need to know – Mac For Beginners.  It takes you through all the steps of OSX (that’s O – S – Ten or the tenth Mac operating system).

2 – Smashinglists has this post on the Top 25 Historic Photographs ever taken.  I admit to often being a little US-centric when talking about famous photos, but this one has a number from Europe especially, including my favorite in this collection – Hitler in Paris.  That particular photo really denotes the sadness of Nazi Germany being in charge of the cultural heritage of much of Europe.

Hitler In Paris

The sadness of Paris under the Nazi jackboot.

3 – This has to be one of the best videos from Bob Kaplitz’s blog, and that is saying a lot.  This video focuses on ways to make standups more creative.

4 – Great cartoon – How NOT to Save Newspapers.

5 – Straight from Google, How Search Works.

6 – If you work in a typical American school, then your internet is likely to be filtered and slow.  This means no Youtube.  So, how can you share youtube videos with your students?  If you are like me and use Google Chrome broswer, then you might want to add this to your browser – a method of downloading videos.

7 – Random Mumblings blog brings us Jeff Cole via Beet.tv to discuss how video is expanding to fill every niche in the content spectrum.

Beet TV Video Expanding

Beet TV Video Expanding

8 – Photojournalism From A Student’s Eye brings us more Photoshop for Reporters – Color Correction with Levels.

He also brings us another podcast tutorial for Final Cut on Transitions and Fades.

9 – Here’s a great history project for web design students – 15 Websites that Changed the Internet.  It has it all, from Facebook to Geocitites.

10 – The Bellringer has just about had it with yearbook staff members who can’t make deadline.  I feel her pain.  How do we get kids to become self-motivating, internally driven to finish work on time?  Ideas?

Well, ten is a nice round number, but not as round as Pi.  Pi day was a couple of days ago.  Yes, I’m a geek for knowing that.

Cool Links #75: The One I Nearly Forgot To Title

We just got our whole shipment of brand new iMacs in at school.  They are pretty, but setting them up is a full time job.  We have 22 new machines and they have to be updated and install Final Cut Express on them first.  In the next couple of weeks we should be getting Adobe CS4 products.  That means more time installing and then setting up the student login account.  Finally we can then switch out all the Mac Minis.  The new machines are so fast and have incredible, huge screens.  So far, the only downside is the wireless mouse and keyboard.  This will mean checking them out each period.  Lost instruction time.  But the cool factor is going to be worth it.  Now, on to the links.

1 – If you teach newspaper or journalism, then you know how difficult it is to get students to write opinion pieces well.  Here’s a great presentation to teach the way to do it right.

2 – Ever had another department want you to shoot their event, edit it, create videos for them and make DVDs too.  And of course they want you to do it all for free.  That’s a lot of wear and tear on the equipment.  I’m not against creating video or any other media for any department, but if it is not news – then we need to charge for our services.  But how much?  I used the FreelanceSwitch Hourly Rate Calculator and it actually gave me a realistic result – $50/hour.  Try it out yourself.

3 – Yearbooks, newspapers, graphic design and video makers all need fonts that are royalty freed.  Here are a couple of sites that offer fonts that you can use.  Dafont.com and Font Squirrel offer contemporary font looks for all your needs.

4 – SF Weekly says we don’t pay for news online because we mainly view it on our work computers Monday-Friday and that we would rather read a real hard copy paper on the weekends.

5 – Straight from the UK, Charlie Brooker has this hilarious sendup of the typical news story.

6 – Photographers have to deal with a dizzying array of alphabet soup:  PNG, JPG, TIFF, PSD, RAW – what does it all mean?  The dPS is always quick with an answer for every photo question.

7 – Natural sound stories can be very powerful ways to sell a story that has strong sound elements.  Advancing the Story blog has a superb list of tips for nat-sound.

8 – Free Tech for Teachers has a super useful post about how to add an RSS feed for any web site in Google Reader.

9 – Adam Westbrook has Five Myths about Shooting Video.  My favorite is Shooting Video is Easy!

10 – The Bob Kaplitz blog is always full of great example videos, both of the what to do variety and the what not to to type.

11 – The Oatmeal comic blog is funny, crazy and a grammarian.  This month it is the semicolon that takes center stage.  Great fun for kids – and they might learn something too.

12 – Tamron lenses has their episode 2 in their DSLR series about focus modes.

Well, I’m going to watch the ‘semi-’pro Bowl now.  Have a great week.

Cool Links #72: The One About The End of A Decade

Seems like a lot of end of 2000s stuff in the old link basket this week.  Loads of stuff though, hope you all like it.

1 – The Oatmeal has lots of great graphics and ideas, but some of them are not safe for schools.  I like this 10 Words You Need To Stop Misspelling.  NSFS, but could easily be adapted.

2 – Save the Media has some suggestions for the AP Stylebook – such as Twitterati, Twitterverse and Tweet.  Best takeaway – it is Tweet, not Twitter – when used as a verb.

3 – David Warlick of 2 Cents Worth has some great Questions for the Next Decade.   I agree that they are questions.  I wonder when we will stop wasting money on textbooks, when PDFs would serve us so much better.  When will we really devote more money to technology.

4 – The New York Times made a terrific icon chart with graphics representing various categories for every year of the past 10.  My fav icon – Starbucks.  The most interesting – Movies in the Mail, an industry that came, grew and will soon be gone in less than 10 years.

5 – Poynter Online has a super list of suggestions for Writing Teachers to include in their lessons and in their classrooms.

6 – Good Magazine has another interesting graphic that sums up 2009 in news stories, by showing each major story as a block in relative size to their importance.

7 – I already teach stance and how to hold the camera to my students, but I’ve never thought about teaching it like marksmanship.  Great idea.

8 – A lot of studies recently have shown that in the last 10 years internet use is up.  Really?  Wow.  Of course it is, there is so much more rich content available now then even just 2-3 years ago.

9 – This post is about brainstorming for bloggers, but I’d say these are great rules for brainstorming in nearly any area, especially yearbook and media classes.

10 – If you don’t have a staff application, you should get one for your yearbook, newspaper, broadcast or other class.  And it’s time to move into the online realm – how about an application made with Google Docs?

11 – I love TED Talks and this one is a really great one:  It’s not about the perfect Pepsi, it’s about the perfect Pepsi’s. This is what I’ve been saying about yearbooks for a while.  We need to stop making the Pepsi yearbook.  We need the flexibility to make a Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew, Slice and even more yearbooks.  With print on demand technology, the yearbook companies need to roll out flexible yearbooks before even more kids stop buying books.

12 – Where did everybody go?  They are no longer going to web pages, but to Facebook, Twitter and YouTube/Hulu.

13 – DSLRs are tough.  This Canon Rebel fell 3000 feet and lived to keep working.

Canon Rebel Falls and Survives

Canon Rebel Falls and Survives

14 – I’ve been looking for this for a long time – a film maker’s dictionary of terms.  Useful if you’ve worked in TV, but only dreamed about movies.

15 – If you’ve ever thought about creating a blog, you should read these 7 Secrets of Edubloging from Free Tech for Teachers – a great award winning site.

16 – I really like reading the new Texas Tribune online news site started just this year.  The Trib is a must read for Texas teachers, because education spending is the largest item in the state budget, so you can bet we take up our part of Texas politics and the Trib covers it.  This article on the divisions between the teaching organizations in Texas was interesting to a 15 year vet who never knew why we had so many.

17 – Again from the 2 Cents Worth blog, what was computing like in 2000 vs. 2010.  We’ve come a long way.

18 – Always funny – 50 Biggest flubs of the Year in Headline writing.  My favorite:

Chance of Rain

Chance of Rain

19 – As we move into a new decade, the Newsosaur says we need to emulate the journalists of the 19th Century, not the 20th.  Muckrakers of the world unite!

20 – Teach Paperless has a list of 21 Things that will become obsolete in the next decade in education.  Lets hope teachers are not one of those things.

21 – Finally, Scott McLeod recently spoke to the NEA and had some interesting things to say.  He recorded both his speech and the Q&A that followed, both are worth a listen.  I only have two criticisms of what he said.  1) He never answered the question of HOW do we get legislatures, Congress and school boards to start spending money in the right places and move the curriculum forward.  2) He also never gave a good answer to what do people do who are not able to master higher level thinking skills after we move to an information/creativity economy.

Unfortunately with all the holiday eating, I’m up to +3.  Ouch.

Cool Links #71: The One With Holidays, Yearbook Pages and Dreams of Snow

It’s been a long semester, but we’re finally at Christmas Break and we have sold a few more books than last year.  We also have more pages done than ever before.  And finally, last night I had a dream of more snow in Houston.  Not likely I know, so I’ll have to deliver a blizzard of links.

1 – While 2009 may not have been a wonderful year for most, it was a great year for photography.  The Boston Globe has a terrific slide show of more than 40 iconic photos of the year.

Barack Obama sworn in as US President

Barack Obama sworn in as US President

2 – Madatoms.com has a graphic that shows the past, present and future decline of journalism.  As terrible as your worst post-apocalyptic science fiction nightmare.

3 – The Digital Photography School just keeps posting photo nuggets for us to all enjoy and use, like 10 Reasons to Turn Off Your Auto Focus.

4 – The whole post is being written using Google Chrome browser for OSX, but of course you can already get it for Windows (XP/Vista).  Not sure why it is not available for Windows 7 yet?    It’s fast and I’ve had few crashes.  To me it is the best of Safari and Firefox.

5 – Next up is an 8 minute video of newspaper headlines that have appeared in The Simpsons.  Funny.

6 – My Canadian friend, author of Notes From A Teacher, has an insightful list of 10 Things that His (journalism) Students Need To Keep In Mind.  Best takeaway – 10. There are many more than 10 things that you need to keep in mind.

7 – Graphjam, always fun, but often insightful had this juicy nugget about where cable news is today.

CNN Take Note

CNN Take Note

8 – These are a cool Christmas gift (And if anyone wants to send me one I won’t complain) keyboard skins for applications.  I’d love one for Final Cut Express.

Keyboard Skins For Apps

Keyboard Skins For Apps

9 – Thank you The Economist for putting teeth into the argument against pay-walls.   I’ve been saying for the last two years that I would never buy an online news subscription or pay micropayments for news because I read TOO MANY newspapers online.  The only way I’d ever consider paying, would be if I could pay a single small monthly fee ($5-7 US a month) that would allow me to read ALL the newspapers, or if they ALL joined one service where I could pay a small fee to read.

10 – Cyberdotnet blog says there will be journalists in the future. I agree.  We just won’t work for “the man.”  Journalists will have to be freelancers who work for many news organizations, plus produce content for their own branded site.

11 – The Teacher Chronicles puts forth 20 Ways You Can Upgrade to Become a Teacher 2.0.  Best Takeaway – 16. Ask your students what they do on the web! Make a list of the websites they mention and make sure you check them out!

12 – I’ve been watching a thread on the Teachpaperless blog about the wonders of technology and what they can do to replace schools and even teachers.  But The Teacher Chronicles has a list of Six Things Technology Can’t Do For You.

13 – I recently lamented the speed and capacity of the Internet service at my school, but in other ways we’ve done a good job at keeping up with technology.  I really agree with this post from The Teacher Chronicles of 11 Ways To Upgrade Your School into School 2.0.

14 – I am a huge fan of Black and White Photography, here are 40 Beautiful Examples of why it rocks!

Big Ben from Metro

Big Ben from Metro

Hope this finds you and yours having a wonderful holiday season.  I’m still at +/- zero.

Cool Links #63: The Wedding Post

I was away for the weekend attending my nephew’s wedding in Dallas and I didn’t find the time to do a cool links post.  But now I have some time to make one.

1 – Thanks to Andy Dickinson for a link to the Flip Video Spotlight site.  Under the Resources tab are videos about shooting and how to’s on production and distribution.

2 – This site may be part of the future of journalism and the arts in general.  This is a funding site for arts, writing, journalism, etc.  called Kickstarter.  Worth looking into.

3 – Anytime you need to show something to your students, it seems like the tech isn’t working that day.  But if you take a screen shot ahead of time, then you have a back up.  This is easy in OSX, and finally easy in Windows 7 – Freetech for Teachers shows us how.

4 – This is a quick and simple list of do’s and don’ts of web design.  Web Design Ledger has a list of 20 do’s and don’ts for the aspiring web designer.

5 – Trying to figure out the whole debate on the subject of Net Neutrality, then this video about the Open Internet helps explain parts of it.

6 – Adam Westbrook has posted his PDF eBook called 6×6: Advice for Multimedia Reporters.  The price is right = free.

7 – The networked blog has a great resource for creating screencasts and posting them online – Screenr.  Looks like it is worth checking out.

8 – Didja know that Mr. T was a teacher? I pity the fool who snapped a towel in his gym class.  How about Sting, Gene Simmons or Sheryl Crow?  All started out as a teacher.  Maybe we can all be famous some day.

9 – Creepy retouching taken WAAAY too far.  The site has a lot of inappropriate language, so I just posted a couple of photos.

10 – JEA has some options for online audio and video editors like Aviary and Jay Cut, but I just don’t think cloud computing is ready for schools yet.  Too often, we have slow internet  with limited bandwidth and filters.  So I don’t see this as a solution for every school yet.

11 – Ryan Sholin has some great advice for journalism students at all levels if they are serious about going into the world of media creation.

12 – Video shooter beFrank shows that you don’t need a super awesome set up to do a super awesome job of shooting a macro “product” shot for b-roll.

13 – Adam Westbrook also has this little gem – the figure 8 style of storytelling.  He says use it for video, but I think it could be powerful in print features too.

14 – If you’re like me, your school blocks everything useful or any kind of bandwidth suck – like video sites.  So if I want to use a video in class I need to be able to download it at home.  This great Firefox plugin is just the thing for that.

I hope you have a great time and Congrats to my nephew David and his new wife Jessica.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28 other followers