Cool Links #109: Not Taken By The Rapture

Contrary to popular opinion, I have not been abducted by space aliens, raptured away or joined a cult.  OK, maybe I did join a cult – or at least my son did – I was drafted by the cult known as Boy Scouts.  As a yearbook advisor, I already have very limited time. Now as a Boy Scouting leader AND still a yearbook advisor, free time has become a mystical concept that is heard about, but never seen.  I am not blog-fading, just trying to figure it all out.  With summer upcoming, I should be able to get back into a rhythm of blogging again.  (I hope.)  Now for the links…

1 – After months of indecision, the Texas Legislature has finally settled on the amount of pain to inflict on public school districts.  If you live here and want to know how bad it will be for the next two years, take a look.  Thanks to the Texas Tribune for providing our state with the best info on every twist and turn of the crazy pink building in Austin.

2 – I love photography.  Didn’t start out that way, but I love it.  I am intrigued by famous photos, especially of “regular” people who just happened to be in a famous photo.  Listverse has a Top 10 of the lives of people made famous by famous photos – especially what happened after the photo was published.

3 – Here is a great tool for creating visualizations for news stories called Many Eyes.  It appears to be free.

4 – Are our First Amendment rights in danger? They are when Police see cameras like this

How Police see SLR Cameras

How Police see SLR Cameras

5 – I recently wrote about how teachers in the US are taking the blame for a problem created outside of schools.  And Finland has been held up lately as the solution to all our problems.  But Finland and the US are nothing like each other.

6 – I deeply respect Mindy McAdams, I think she is one of the best professors in online journalism today.  I mainly agree with her post – that it is not stupid to major in journalism today, as long as the student understands the landscape.  They must be prepared to never work for a traditional news organization, or only work for one for a short time.  They must be ready to work for a small online startup, maybe even a series of them.  Their career will be very different from journalists of the past.

7 – Now this is a Facebook style photo that is worthy of being called a photograph.

Houston, that is going on my Facebook page.

Houston, that is going on my Facebook page.

8 – I love my Mac, but I hate waiting for Photoshop or Final Cut to render.  The Macintosh Performance Guide has all kinds of ways to help you get the most out of your Mac and the software on it, like the Adobe line of products.  Worth studying.

9 – This is turning into a “stuff I love” post, but I’ve had nothing but great experiences with the wonderful people at B&H Photo.  Apparently a camera they were testing (a used one) mistakenly ended up leaving their store with the photos still on it.  This gave the outside world a glimpse into the world of B&H.  I love the photos.  I love the fact that B&H is closed on Jewish holidays, just like I love the fact that Chick-fil-a is closed on Sundays.  I respect businesses that have a positive ethos and B&H does this well.  They provide a great service at a good price, by friendly people.

10 – Need a free, easy to use HTML editor look no further, just click on the link.

11 – At my school, we ditched our photo company a long time ago – too costly.  We now take our photos ourselves, and this means training the students on how to take a good portrait.  But what is good for a thin person, doesn’t work with someone like myself – someone who has a higher BMI.  dPs has a top flight post on how to photograph larger people.

12 – If you are like me, many of the photos in your yearbook are taken by staffers who never took a photo class.  They got a quick and fast version of it in yearbook class and they shoot most of their photos with a point and shoot – often badly.  Clifford Otto has a terrific post about how to hold your point and shoot to get the best photos.

13 – I know this is how many teachers and students feel about school right now.

Not sure you get 100% in May

Not sure you get 100% in May

14 – Do ethics matter in online journalism, maybe more so than ever.  Check out this post from Mindy McAdams with 10 Rules for Online Ethics.  Best takeaway – #2 Assume everything you write online will become public.

15 – Petapixel has the best explanation of depth of field I’ve ever seen.

16 – This is a fun site to teach kids about ISO, shutter and aperture – Camera Sim.

17 – I’ve heard that the kerfluffle over staging shots of presidential speeches has changed the official policy at the White House, but it is sad that they ever did it this way to begin with.

18 – This is pretty geeky and contains math content, but it is interesting – the f/stop scale is logarithmic because humans are bad at telling the difference in brightness, unless it is really big.

19 –  The owners of Leica Camera were the Oskar Schindlers of the photo world.  The untold story of how they snuck Jews out of Germany before and during WWII.

 

I have more, but I’m saving some for later in the week.

 

Cool Links #105: The One About A Long List

I haven’t done a links post in so long I think people have aged since then.  Sorry, but all you yearbook teachers out there understand – this is the crazy season.  Lots of deadlines from now until we finish.  The walking dead are yearbook teachers without enough coffee – real zombies.   So here are some links…

1 – This one is super cool, data – journalism – education – interactive all rolled into one.  The interactive map of ROI on education.  Just check it out, my school district was actually lime green.

2 – The terrific Bob Kaplitz blog has a graphic with the four levels of story-telling.  Very useful, I’m going to share it with my broadcast journalism kids.  Maybe we can move past level 2.

3 – Here’s a sad graphic.  Educators one of the five worst paid jobs with a degree.

4  - The Daily Grind has a response from the trenches to President Obama’s remarks in the SOTU about education.  Worth reading.

5  - This is funny, and yet true in its own way.  Follows the baffle ‘em with BS theory.

6 – Some of us are old enough to remember black screens with green letters and punch cards.  Our smart phones and iPads are nearly proof that we live in the future.  Ars Technica has a lengthy, but good article about the evolution of computer screens.

7 – Thanks to PetaPixel – this is really cool.  They found someone who still shoots old fashioned Ambrosetypes (similar to Daguerrotypes).

8 – This could be my student’s motto:  From Overheard in the Newsroom.

9 – OK, I’ve never heard of useit.com before, but I’ve heard of nearly all the ideas in this article before.  They just packaged it all together in one spot.  They restate what I’ve heard of people who read on the web and what is known about scanning.  This is why journalists must get back to basics on the inverted pyramid and headline writing.

10 – This is great!

Photoshop CS4 Cream

Photoshop CS4 Cream

11 – Thanks to Bellringers for a series of professional development sessions we’d all really love to see.

12 – We have to stop forcing boys (and some girls) into the box of the “good student.”  I learned so much from my own son and two former students from my broadcast journalism class.  All of these students are the get up and go kind of people.  They can’t stand to be sitting down – unless they are playing a video game, musical instrument, etc.  They have to be active.  We can’t keep forcing passive learning on them.

13 – I still think this kind of photo-retouching is wrong.  People used to smoke – everyone knows that.  I don’t think Churchill will make a kid want to take up the cigar.

14 – My students do this all the time…

Stop Printing

Stop Printing

15 – These kids from Quebec have no idea what a record player is for, or an 8-track.  How long until iPods are obsolete?

16 – Maybe if more journalists acted like this, there’d be more readers/viewers/visitors – see Overheard in the Newsroom.

I think I may post again tomorrow.  Getting sleepy – still got lots of links in the hopper.

 

Cool Links #104: The One During The “Universal Holiday” Break

I heard this on Disney Channel the other day – Happy Universal Holiday.  We have now officially crossed over into the world of Big Corporate and 1984.  It is amazingly sad how newspeak is taking over our language.  When I read the book 1984, in 1984 I never thought it would come to pass.  But now I live in that world.  So, let’s use the interwebs to find something to take our mind off of it all and be better j-teachers after the break.  Here come the links -

1 –  There doesn’t seem to be a way to add xtranormal movies to my wordpress blog, but I can link to them. Here’s a funny one about a young comm. grad who wants to be a big TV news star.

2 – The Principal’s Page has a funny about schools taking the blame for what happens at home.

3 – As journalists and educators, we should be very interested in “What is the best question in the world?”

4 – This is how e-textbooks are created.

5 – If you are a blogger, and you should be, then you should back it up!  FreeTech4Teachers will show you how.  Just backed up mine.

6 – Seen a number of Year in Photos around the web for 2010 – Denver Post, Boston Globe,

7 – My school district recently set up a moodle server and I use it nearly every day.  I love it.  Here’s a chart with the pros/cons of moodle.

8 – If you teach broadcast journalism, then you must watch and subscribe to Austin’s Josh Hinkle who has posted some great videos about what life is like as a solo-mojo on the go in Austin, TX at KXAN.  Thanks Josh.

9 – This post from WDL has a useful Photoshop keyboard shortcut desktop pattern and a color wheel sheet (printable).

10 – WDL has been hitting it with useful posts lately.  Here’s on on apostrophe and quote marks – you are not doing it right.

11 – New Term – PHObar:  Photoshopped Beyond All Recognition.

PHObar

PHObar

12 – Google has a new YouTube channel called Teach My Parents Tech.  It really should be Teach Tech to Anyone, but anyway – it is useful for teaching simple tech tips to people.  Here’s an example

13 – Since I live in Houston, I’ve been following the story of Lamar High School’s library closely and the early stories about it were dead wrong – no books burned, only 20 year old books trashed, 11,000 books kept, nearly 90 laptops for use in the library, not 20, etc.  The Innovative Educator has valuable post on the subject.

14 – As a photo/video-grapher you will have to deal with wet weather if you shoot outdoor sports.  Clifford Oto has a picture perfect post about his dealings with rain this football season.

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

And The Rain, Rain, Rain Came Down, Down, Down

15 – Rick Sammon is the online guru of photo.  This post is simply about one thing – GET CLOSE!

Get Closer

Get Closer

16 – Why do all “curriculum planners” act like this?  It seems like everyone has met at least one curriculum planner who has zero knowledge of actual teaching.

Have a great “universal holiday” break.

Cool Links #99: The One About Relaxing

As the song says, “Relax, don’t do it.”  Today is the beginning of the long march to Thanksgiving.  Holidays are few and far between for the next three months.  So, we must take today and relax as much as possible.  I smell a nap later, so here’s the links -

1 – Templates for TV graphics save time and effort, plus make your show’s look have some consistency, but inevitably someone forgets to complete the graphic before air time.

Add Caption Here

Add Caption Here

2 – Why is your fancy new iPad the size of a paperback book?  Or a better question is: where did all the “standard” sizes for books come from in the first place – sheep!

3 – The KRG blog has a list of 12 essential skills for aspiring journalists.  It is a good list, but it is missing one important skill – the ability to monetize your content.  Take some business classes.

4 – I  can’t remember if I have mentioned this resource before.  He does not have any journalism courses, but his story is inspiring. Khan Academy is a super resource for students struggling with math or science.  His free youtube channel has taught thousands.

5 – FORA.tv has a conversation with Bill Gates that focuses mainly on education.  Like so many others who have never taught, they think they can solve all the ills of education.  Gates’ magic wand is charter schools.  He forgets that unlike charters, many students in public schools do NOT want to be there, there is a deficit of parental support and we can not negotiate our way out of special education mandates.  He also doesn’t acknowledge the high burnout rate and lower pay for teachers in charter schools.  He also thinks that a third year teacher is better than a veteran teacher, because they work harder.  Working harder is not always working smarter.  I work plenty hard now, I know I’m a better teacher after 15 years, than after only two.  And finally, he wants to record every minute of the classroom day with a web cam.  How many parents would agree to having their children recorded?  He should stick to software that crashes and leave the classrooms of America alone.

6 – Just for TV Teachers has struck a nerve, or had his struck.  He wonders if all the time, money and attention devoted to high school football is worth it?  There are times where I wonder the same thing.  Don’t get me wrong, I played high school football and in the band.  I enjoy going to games and I love the game itself.  But in many states the insane amounts of money that are diverted to sports at the secondary level could be used to improve the quality and number of teachers, or purchase equipment and instructional materials that are sorely needed.  In a time where many states are slashing education budgets, how many have seriously thought about cutting sports or even cutting their budgets?  When times are good and there is more than enough money for all, sports are a luxury we can afford – but when belt tightening is required, why does the athletic department so often get a pass?

7 – This next post is just for fun – cardboard cameras.   Too bad they don’t work.

Cardboard Camera

Cardboard Camera

8 – News hits home, film at eleven.

News hits home

News hits home

9 – The clone stamp tool can be very useful when doing artistic or touch up work on a portrait – never for journalism.  All Web Design Info offers this tutorial.

10 – Is this the “next big thing?” The merging of TV station newscasts and newspapers.  Who knows, but the blog Reflections of a Newsosaur thinks so.

11 – My local newspaper here in Houston is closing it’s doors for good.  The last issue was tossed on my driveway last week.  It was published for 70 years.  I knew the editor pretty well and I know that the ever shrinking metro the Houston Chronicle never covered our area well before, they won’t be doing a better job with a smaller staff.

12 – Etaoin Shrdlu thinks that newspapers started dying when they stopped offering something of value.  He compares it to Starbucks.  You can get a cup of coffee for way less than $1 almost anywhere, but coffee at Starbucks is usually more than $3 and people line up to pay.  They do so, because Starbucks also offers both customization and a place to drink the coffee in a nice atmosphere.  Newspapers missed out in the past by keeping their price artificially low – this encouraged customers to see news as virtually free, even before the internet.  Since the internet, newspapers have missed the boat on customization.  They should have been creating systems for people to make their own custom news feed/page.  And finally, they also could have been a part of creating atmosphere – they should have found a way to get their newspaper in every coffee house in their readership area.

13 – Random Mumblings blog says that newspapers need to stop thinking about the paper edition.  They should focus on the web, because that is where people get their news today.

14 – If you ever wanted to know how to light a subject for a photoshoot – DIY photography has 13 video tutorials on how to set up lighting.

That’s a wrap – en

Cool Links #98: The One That Took Two Weeks To Finish

‘Twas the night before school and all through the house, the kids were sad, and so were the teachers.  Not really, but it makes a good scene.  Both children and teachers in this house are ready to go back – mostly.  So, here’s a few last minute links to bide you over the first day back.  Mine is tomorrow.

[Editor's note:  I started this post last Sunday, the night before the first day of school.  I'm finishing it seven days later.  It was a long week - can you tell?]

1 – Journalists in the 21st Century really MUST be jacks-of-all-trades, so says the hiring practices of most media organizations.  Honestly, I was getting this advice back in 1988 – so, really is this a surprise?

2 – Net Neutrality is all the rage right now – thanks Google, you surrender monkeys.  Read, Write, Web has a super graphic with 15 facts about Net neutrality.

3 – More than any other mathematical concept, the Golden Ratio has my attention.  I love the many ways that the ratio is represented in art, music, architecture, nature and more.  It is a divine concept.

4 – The Beaumont, Texas office of Taylor Publishing (Balfor now?) has a cool resource site – check it out!

5 – Tamron video wants to help you use your Flash better in Episode 12 of their continuing series of photography videos.

6 – Free Tech 4 Teachers has a list of 140 user generated ideas for things that teachers are going to try in their classrooms this year.  I’m in the slideshow (yea me!) and I’m going to try Moodle.  My district has started it’s own Moodle site.  I really like it so far.

7 – I stumbled upon DigitalRev after watching a great stress test video that pitted a Nikon vs. a Canon camera.  DigitalRev has a Youtube channel and a great blog too.  I’ve added them to my RSS and Youtube subs.

8 – The Principal’s Page had a great graphic timeline of the History of the Internet.  Huge!

9 – Gizmodo had a good companion to the last link – The Secret History of those $%&@ing Computer Symbols.  My favorite is – of course the Mac Command symbol.

10 – According to Wired Magazine – The Web is Dead:  Long Live the Internet. It’s a Pro vs. Con on the walled gardens or suburbia of the internet – phone apps.

11 – After the Exposure Triangle – dPs wants us to get a little more advanced with our thinking about the exposure triangle = meaning aperture is more than just more light.

12 – The Internet gets news out faster and better right?  Not when Twitter punks the news.  Rumors can run rampant and then CNN and others actually report fake news stories.  Oh Dang, can you say retraction.   And in a related post, The Chive, punked us all with Dry Erase girl.  Supposedly she quit her job with a series of photos posted on a photo sharing site, telling all about her boss.  But alas, it was just a hoax – it did come from the Onion-like Chive site.  Duh.

13 – The Kobrechannel has a list of Five Things They Can’t Believe Every News Video Doesn’t Already Have.  Byline anyone!

14 – The folks over at 2¢Worth are trying to create an innovative online/DVD yearbook mashup.  No printed copy or only as a print on demand product.  I’m interested in seeing how this might work.

15 – Thanks to the Principal’s Page blog for reminding us all of this.  As the year goes by, things get busy and they often get hard.  It’s the hard that makes it great.

16 – I love this. Stickers for the newspaper, with truth in advertising about the news contained inside.  Could be used in yearbook too!  Not as funny as you think.

Quid es Veritas?

Quid es Veritas?

That’s a wrap.

Cool Links #97: Back To School Edition

Here in Texas, most public schools start the week of Aug. 24.  It became state law a couple of years ago, that schools can’t start before then.  That means teachers return next Monday in many districts.  I’m ready to get back to work.  I really do feel the like the long, recently hot, summer is over.  So, let’s cool it down with links.

1 – The wonderfully named Robert Picard thinks Journalism is in Good Health.  I suppose in a Darwinian way, as the number of journalism jobs decrease, those who are serious about the craft will win out over those who are not.  Let’s hope that the Business of journalism will find some health too.

2 – This is something we’ve struggled with – HD video.  We have cameras that do SD, widescreen SD, 720p and 1080i HD.  The One Man Band Reporter tries to explain why using HD in the newsroom is difficult and slow going.

3 – What will happen if yearbooks disappear?  How will we find embarrassing photos of actors and politicians from their high school years?

Who's this good looking young guy?

Who's this good looking young guy?

4 – This is so true.  How can these kids show up looking like $1 million bucks at the first bell and look so bad when they get to picture day?

Yearbook Photo Day Readiness

Yearbook Photo Day Readiness

5 – Adam Westbrook is running a series on Blogging.  How, why and everything else.  So far, my favorite one has been How To Build An Audience.  It’s really not just about blogging, but about appealing to those who want the content you’ve got.  The rest of the series is pretty good, worth putting into your RSS feed.

6 – This is a great little nugget – Lee Hood’s Broadcast Journalism Tips.

7 – This post really hit it right on the head.  So many adults today think that kids are born wired into the computer, but they are not born tech savvy, they are tech comfy.

8 – The JPROF has a super post – Seven Steps To An Audio Slideshow.  I think I will use this with my photojournalism kids this year.

9 – This is hilarious – a soccer team (football across the pond) in England banned photographers from their games and insisted newspapers buy the photos from their official photographer.  So a newspaper covered the game with an artist - like a court story here in the US.  Funny.

10 – PetaPixel has a fun video comparing the new Barbie Cam Doll with a Canon DSLR.

It's A Barbie World

It's A Barbie World

11 – I’ve been trying to find a way to spice up a lesson on historical photographers.  This looks like the kids might enjoy it – A Historical Facebook Page for an historical figure.

12 – This post from Copyblogger – 60 Ways to Increase your Influence online would be worth it just for #1 – David Meerman Scott. “Stop talking about your products and services. People don’t care about products and services; they care about themselves.” -@dmscott

13 – Photo Agency head Neil Burgess says Photojournalism is Dead.  I think that is overstating it a bit.  What I think he is really trying to say is that quality photography is dead.  The tyranny of good-enough is here.

14 – Mindy McAdams has posted a superb example on how to teach the five shot method for broadcast journalism.

15 – This is bound to be useful – a Final Cut plugin to change multiple fonts at once.  Thanks Alex4d.

16 – Black Star Rising has posted part 3 of a series – Why The First Amendment Matters.

17 – The Denver Post has a great collection of images from the 1930s in color – yes color.  Great collection from a time when nearly all the photos are black and white.

America - 1930s in Color

America - 1930s in Color

18 – There are a number of good collections of journalism videos on YouTube including: How to Be a Local Sports Reporter with Jamal Spencer, How to Be a Local TV News Reporter with Bill Albin, YouTube’s own Project Report, and the YouTube Reporter’s Center.

Have a great back to school week!

Cool Links #96: The One About Busy-ness

I’ve been busy.  It seems that summer too can be a busy season.  I’ve had meetings and phone calls and my son’s football camp.  Lots to do, lots to do.  So, cool links haven’t bubbled to the top of the to do list until now – nearly a week late.  And to add insult to injury, my read it later password expired and I didn’t notice for several days that items were not being added to my read it list.  So, some cool links have been lost forever.  Sad face.  Here’s the links I’ve been able to add, re-add or just plain found by brute force search.

1 – Teachers At Risk has a top notch post – Nine Things My Students Have Taught Me. If only it were just nine, but a great list.  Best take away - 1. I’ve learned that students need me to be a teacher and not their friend.

2 – And to piggyback on that post, from the same source comes Nine Questions I Ask My Students On The First Day.  Best take away – 1. When have you felt particularly successful in school?

3 – Common Craft has several helpful videos on YouTube for those that teach anything to do with the Web.

4 – The Digital Photography School should be in every media teacher’s RSS reader – because of nuggets like How To Work With Locked Pixels.

5 – Seems like this is a favorite topic right now – extending the school year or eliminating summer vacation.  Time magazine has a long article that goes around the topic, but never really decides what to think.  I see both sides to the argument.  Summer would be very expensive in the south – A/C would run non-stop.  The travel industry would be hurt badly and the traditional vacation plan would have to be rethought.  But there are upsides to changing the summer schedule.  More days in the calendar might take some pressure off and allow more in-depth teaching.  Fewer days off would lessen the effects of lost retention.  But most teachers would want more compensation for more days and it would only be fair.  Plus, as it happened in Texas, you really can’t have just some of the schools go to a year-round schedule and others stay on a traditional one.  It won’t work.  It has to be all or nothing.

6 – Copyright Office says that jailbreaking and re-mixing are OK!  And they said that teachers and students can remix and reuse with few if any restrictions.  Read about it at Free Tech 4 Teachers.  Fair Use Win!

7 – I’ve been looking for a good online “text” for Web Design for a while, and the Web Styleguide is it.  It’s 12 chapters seem to cover all the basic areas that a designer needs to know.  I only wish it were available in a PDF format.

8 – Tamron lenses posted their second video about Photo Composition – give it a look.

9 – I just had to share this – the long weekend theory of summer vacation from An Untenured Teacher.  I’m still hanging on to Saturday, but Sunday morning is just days away.

10 – Teachers At Risk seems to be my favorite blog today – lots of great content, for example How The Web May Be Spoiling Our Students.

11 – This has to be one of the best ideas that has ever been on MTV, since they stopped playing actual music. If You Really Knew Me is a show about a program that focuses on character education in high schools around the country.  I’ve only watch the first episode, but I can see the power that this program could have in almost any school.  Make sure to start with episode 101.

12 – If you are a journalism or media teacher and your students are not publishing online, then you definitely need to read the Innovative Educator’s post about Sticking It To the Man and Publish Online.

13 – OK, be honest – how many of you have had a broadcast, newspaper issue or  yearbook that ended up like this?

Insert Image Title Here

Insert Image Title Here

14 – Peta Pixel blog has a great post about a music video made for $500 done in one take.  Not only is the video cool, but they also have a behind the scenes video too.

15 – Why do they do it?  Why do photojournalists doctor photos and then claim they just mistakenly sent in the wrong image?  Seems like there is a lot of it going around right now and BP just can’t seem to do anything right.

16 – Worried that photos you post to the internet will end up on a billboard, or in an ad somewhere and you didn’t get paid or even a photo credit?  Google is releasing a new service called TinEye – a reverse image search, so you can find out if your photos are being used somewhere else.

17 – Want some advanced InDesign and Photoshop Tips for Yearbook – The Yearbook Connection has a great resource page.  Check it out.

18 – If you are from Texas and you don’t know Hal Schmidt, then you need to meet him.  He works in Houston for the office of Taylor Publishing, and he knows his tech.  His page has all kinds of great resources and teaching tips.  Hal is your Pal.

19 – I love these A to Z yearbook terminology cards.  I am going to download them all – thanks Yearbook Ladies.

20 – Is solo reporting too much for reporters, with the always on deadline 24/7/365 news cycle?  The Journalism Classroom Notebook thinks that today’s journalists are likely to face lots of burnout and possibly change to other careers more quickly.

21 – Black Star Rising blog has a superb review of the history of the First Amendment and why it is so important to keep defending it today.

Wow, I guess I had more links than I thought – of course now I won’t have anything for Sunday!  lol.  I hope you are still enjoying your time off – I start back at school on Aug. 16 (no students until Aug. 23).  Hoping to enjoy my last few weeks off.

Cool Links #94: The One About The Midpoint

Here in most of Texas, we are about mid-way through the summer.  And for many of us, summer will end early because of back to work tasks that can’t wait – like getting all the computers hooked up and running, taking football/band/cheerleader pictures and meeting with the new yearbook rep.  All things we yearbook teachers do off-the-clock and unpaid.  No one has any idea how many hours of unpaid work go into being a yearbook teacher.  Our stipends don’t even come close.  We work from before the year starts until long after it ends and get a stipend that pales in comparison to the lowliest coach.  But, enough about that.  On to the links:

1 – Here is a collection of sad graphics about the decline of the news industry – focusing on the last three years called A Quick Primer on the US News Industry.

2 – Thanks to the Principal’s Page Blog2 for this photo – it really brings to life the computing revolution:  size, price and power ready to take anywhere.  I really miss my old Bondi Blue iMac.  But I love my new iMac even more.  We retired our last bubble iMac from the lab this year – it was 8 years old and still going as a printer server.

iMac v iPad

iMac v iPad

3 – This is a great article for any young, would-be journalist at either the college or high school level to read.  Thanks Ms. Yada, I hope the job search is going well.

4 – OK, yes clip art is so, like the ’90s.  But sometimes you really need a good piece of clip art for a powerpoint presentation.  Here is a royalty free clip art site for teachers.   As always, check the guidelines before reproducing anything.

5 – I’m incensed about the BP oil spill in the gulf.  As of this week, tar balls have been sighted on Galveston beaches.  Just like the Louisiana gulf coast, East Texas gulf coast was hit by hurricanes Rita, Katrina and Ike.  Many coastal towns live on tourist dollars in the summer months to feed them all year long.  Others from shrimping and fishing.  The last thing these towns need is the oil disaster that BP has unleashed upon us all.  The whole gulf coast is feeling it, but BP and the White House keep lowballing the problem and trying to keep journalist from seeing the real devastation.  I hope brave photogs and video crews keep thwarting the rent-a-cops and Coast Guard to publish photos that keep the disaster fresh in our minds.

6 – Here is where our industry is heading, as ad dollars keep shrinking and publications close, those few that remain will be more beholden to the ad money they still get.  This is especially true for trade publications – those magazines that cover a single industry, or group of related industries.  A reporter for Motorcyclist Magazine was allegedly fired because he did a story critical of a major sponsor – a helmet maker.  Who will be watching the watchers?

7 – This confirms something I’ve know for a while, minorities use the mobile web (smart phones/laptops/netbooks) more than Anglos.  I suspect it is because phones and netbooks are cheaper than a traditional desktop or high-end laptop and provide the user the mobility to seek out wifi at places like McDonalds, the public library, schools, Starbucks, etc.  That is a powerful combination for those who don’t own a home (rent) or have a need to be mobile due to their work (truck drivers, construction workers, seasonal laborers, etc.).  I think this is an important finding for those who wish to market to minority groups (yearbook).  You have to go where the customers are – online via mobile.

8 – Everyone has a story.  Eight million people live in the NYC area, each one has a story.  This is a great way to show your student journalists how to get personality profiles.

9 – If you don’t have great video of the event, then you need great storytelling/standups.  The ever-great Kaplitz blog has a superb example.

10 – I ran across this little tidbit while working on a lesson about Matthew Brady – how photos were made in the 1860s.

11 – If you create a web site, then you should validate the code.  This helps to make sure that your page is compliant with all web standards – All Web Design Info has a list of several sites to do just that.

12 – Working with type on the web?  Then you need these Six Super Helpful Typography Cheat Sheets.

13 – Here’s another resource for teachers wanting to learn the Google tools for your classroom – a 33 page guide from Free Tech 4 Teachers.

14 – And we wonder why journalists are held in such low regard and no one wants to pay for our work?  It is no wonder when well-respected publications keep violating the most basic of ethical standards – don’t modify photos.

Economist modifies photo of Obama

Economist modifies photo of Obama

15 – Want to use a popular song in a YouTube video, but you don’t want to pay an arm and a leg for the rights.  Now you can – Rumblefish is a service that is supposed to sell the musical rights to video creators who want to post to YouTube.  The rights are usually between $2-25 for a song and are only good for YouTube.  Try it out and let me know how it went.

16 – What makes a great teacher? No one thing, maybe these 12 things each contribute to being a great teacher – I think number 5 and 6 are pretty important.

17 – I’m always looking for more of these Photos That Changed The World to add to my collection.  Some great ones in this collection – Ghandi and Brady.

Keep having a great summer.  I just finished an 8 hour InDesign CS4 tutorial that took me about two weeks to complete – up next Photoshop, then Flash.

Cool Links #93: The One About Independence Day

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”  If only we could live up to these ideals.  But the first link today shows that we don’t.

1 – The First Amendment is dead.  Just ask Anderson Cooper.  Link via ShortForm Blog.

2 – If you live in Boston,  it may be too much to visit USC or if you are in Washington, then University of Miami is a long commute for a campus visit.  But youniversitytv can help your student get a look at a far away campus they are considering for a college choice.

3 – The Journal Register Company, a small chain of 18 publications is now running it’s entire operation open source.  Check it out at the Ben Franklin Project.  Freedom of the Press is for those who own the presses.  The Press is now FREE!

4 – I hate the pen tool.  In photoshop, illustrator, etc.  I don’t like it.  I don’t get it.  All Web Design Info wants to change that and help me and you learn how to control the pen tool.

5 – Don’t know how to post a video to YouTube?  It’s only seven basic steps away.

6 – Google Apps For Education has some training available for you at the right price – FREE! Learn all the basics for all the Ed Apps.  And then get certified.

7 – Royalty Free music is hard to come by – Adam Westbrook has Five Places for Cheap or Free Music for your video project.

8 – On a day when Freedom is supposed to ring, we are hearing the slow death of freedom.  At a time where nearly everyone carries a camera with them every day in their pocket, a photographer was harassed for trying to shoot video in Miami.  You have to watch this.  I can’t believe this is America, sounds more like the Soviet Union to me – “where are your papers, comrade?”  What scares me the most is that nobody seems to care.

9 – Maybe we need to show this to everyone!

10 – All Web Design Info has a simple series of graphics that explain how CSS3 Properties work.

11 – Great advice for young, starting off journalists from 10,000 words blog.  My advice via my j-prof:  “Get the secretary to like you.  The world is run by the secretaries.”  Best advice since my high school band director – “If you’re early, you’re on time.  If you’re on time, you’re late.”

12 – The Denver Post followed one kid from high school graduation to boot camp, to Iraq and back.  Great photo story telling.

13 – Not sure where I found this presentation about HTML 5, but make sure you start on slide 16 and skip the Java Script stuff unless you need to know about that too.

14 – Adventures in Pencil Integration has Six Lies We Tell Ourselves about Technology.  The biggest lies we teachers tell ourselves is:  If only I had this piece of technology or software, then everything would go smoothly in my classroom.

Have a happy Independence Day.

Cool Links #92: The One About Training

I’ve taken a little time off from the old blog because I’ve been up to Dallas for nearly a week and it left me fairly exhausted.  I went to the Taylor Publishing Co. Adviser Development Workshop.  It is a great four day training that includes an entire day just to learn technology.  That was great.  I enjoyed it a lot, but with travelling, it was a six day marathon.  But now, I’m back and rested.  So, on to the links.

1 – Free Technology for Teachers definitely understands the conundrum those of us who can’t access Youtube at school face and he has posted several ways to download their vids for later use.

2 – Is the Pen Tool a mystery to you?  Would you like to be a Photoshop Pen Master?  All Web Design blog has a primer on the ways of the Pen Tool for those of us who live in fear of it.

3 – The Pew Internet Project has a super slide show on how the Internet has changed from 2000 to 2010 and it is really instructive to see how just 10 years have changed things.

4 – This would solve a lot of things…

If Only We Could

If Only We Could

5 – Here is a collection of weird and crazy things that have happened to reporters on air or on tape.

This one is the wildest.

6 – Here’s a blog I’m adding to my RSS reader, BillMecca.com.  He’s a video journalist who posts lost of great stuff to his fledgling blog.

7 – Why do Video Journalists do it?  Work the long hours, slinging heavy gear?  Check out this video, it answers all the questions.

8 – The life of a one-man-band, how do they do it all?  Shoot, edit, standup, report, shoot b-roll, upload, live shot.  Whew.

9 – Campfire Journalism has a top notch post called A Few Lessons Learned From Teaching Online Journalism.  And since almost all journalism is online these days, this is a must read for all journalism teachers.

10 – Setting up lights for a portrait shoot, or a group photo day, or for a TV interview?  Sylights has a setup for you - or two or many, many more.

11 – Why is Net Neutrality important?  Check out this video by some internet stars.

12 – There are no boring stories, just bad reporters.  This one is good.

13 – I use Mac, so I don’t know nothing about Windows.  But I do know that all computers get slow once in a while.  Hongkiat has 9 Super Tips To Speed up Windows 7.

14 – I was asked to do a Q&A on the JEA website.  Very cool.

15 – This is a really cool idea – 24 Hours in photos at a Wal-Mart.  What about 8 Hours at your school?

16 – Slow News Day.

Slow News Day

No News Is Good News

17 – Why should we care about HTML5 and why is Apple trying to ram it down our throats and kill Flash?  All your answers to this are right here.

18 – It’s time to embrace the new media, but old media is still lagging – here are five things they just don’t get about new media.

19 – Let’s end with a great video about Teachers, why we need to value them.

Have a great summer.  See you soon.

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