Cool Links #24: Jack’s Back

I am an on again, off again fan of the TV show 24.  I usually don’t watch it on FOX television because it has always competed with a show I like better.  So I wait patiently until the DVD sets come out and then I watch it marathon style, renting it on the Internet and getting the discs in my mailbox.  Yet another way tech is killing old media.  But that is not what today’s post is about – mostly.  Today is about cool stuff!

1) The Credit Crisis Visualized.  I saw this via Neatorama and it is worth the watch.  Why aren’t more online newspapers doing creative, easy-to-understand, almost fun online graphics like this? (If it is possible to have a fun graphic about the meltdown of the global economy?) This is the best explanation of the credit crisis I’ve seen yet.

These posts were created by a grad student – Jonathan Jarvis.  Great job.  Too bad someone didn’t produce this two years ago and show us all the danger we were in. Isn’t that the media’s job?

2) Our cousins down in New Zealand need our support, even if we can’t help directly.  The government of that beautiful country seems to have lost their minds and has decided that you are guilty before anyone proves you did anything wrong.  Their new “copyright” law will make Kiwi’s averse to creating anything on the Internet for fear of being accused of violating someones copyright.  The mere accusation is enough to put them in jail.

New Zealand's new Copyright Law presumes 'Guilt Upon Accusation' and will Cut Off Internet Connections without a trial. Join the black out protest against it!

3) A professor of journalism at the University of Scranton posted this list on his blog, J-Scranton.  The list is a must learn for 21st Century journalism. He writes…

According to an excerpt of the memo posted by The New Republic:

Stories need to be both interesting and illuminating–we don’t have the luxury of running stories folks won’t click on or spend several minutes with in the paper.

a) Would this be a “most e-mailed” story?

b) Would I read this story if I hadn’t written it?

c) Would my mother read this story?

d) Will a blogger be inspired to post on this story?

e) Might an investor buy or sell a stock based on this story?

f) Would a specialist learn something from this story?

g) Will my competitors be forced to follow this?

If you teach journalism students, please read his entire blog post and then find a way to convey this to your students.  I think the list can be tweaked for student media very easily – mainly letters e and g.

4) Mindy McAdams has a great post in her series RGMP (Reporters Guide to Multimedia Proficiency) and this one is all about photojournalism.  It has so many links, it is going to take me a while to go over it all.  Lots of goodies.  Thanks Mindy. There are six other previous posts in this series too.

5) This is a great post on how creative lighting, makeup and technique can be used to make one model look 10 – 20 – 30 – 40 – 50 – 60 years old.  This should show anyone in photography that photos can, do and will lie – it doesn’t always take Photoshop either.

6) The Nieman Journalism Lab has posted the top 15 papers based on visits and out of the list 14 have increased their total number of visits from 7 percent to 132 percent from the same time last year.  Most posting increases of more than 30 percent with an average of nearly 40 percent.  The only one with a decrease was the Houston Chronicle.  I think this is evidence that even in this economy, online can support news gathering to a certain degree, especially when newspapers stop duplicating content and cut the costs associated with that.

7) If you are trying to increase yearbook sales or “market” your yearbook more effectively, then you might want to consider reading the Definitive Guide to Word of Mouth Advertising.  Word of mouth seems to be the only way to reach teens these days.

8) The Tennessean.com has an interesting article about how journalism is not dying, it’s just returning to its roots.  The article compares the models of hyperlocal online to broad sheets of the 1700s.

9) There are some days where I really think my kids are doing great work and then there are days where I think we can do so much more.  Watch Out! makes me want to do more.  Here’s a group of middle school kids creating great video projects.  Awesome.

10) It just works.  Cueprompter is an online telelprompter solution that is free and works great.  I think we are going to put it to use in our studio.

11) This is mainly for US readers who are also bloggers, the Electronic Freedom Foundation has a great blogger’s rights site.  There is a lot of info on their rights in the US including a legal guide for bloggers.

12) I love listening to TWIP (This Week in Photography) with Scott Bourne and all the others, he has a simple, easy to follow explanation of how to use levels to tone a photograph in Photoshop.

13) “You are smarter than your camera.” What great advice.  I tell this to my students too.  The Digital Photography School wants you to use your camera on manual mode and they have a great guide for doing it.

That’s it for this installment.  The links you saw were presented in real time.


About these ads

Leave a comment

No comments yet.

Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28 other followers