Yearbooks Featured On Glee

I’ve not really been a fan of the FOX show Glee, but I heard that it recently featured an episode where the yearbook was a prominent part of the plot.  So, I had to check it out.

I was not entirely surprised to see that Glee parodies high school stereotypes to a T.  There are the over-aggressive, dumb jocks, the super competitive cheerleaders and the geeky drama kids in the glee club.  OK, cue every cliche about high school.

I did like a little bit of the episode.  I do like the Indian-American principal, who seems to run the yearbook as a yellow pages for the local chamber of commerce.  Ka-ching.  He is hard nosed and quick to make a buck from any club or organization.

Mostly, I enjoyed the somewhat true-to-life portrayal of the one stickler teacher who is quick to point out other’s wrong doing, but ready to break the rules to cover up her own short comings.  I think we’ve all known that teacher before.  I also enjoyed the over competitive nature of the same cheer-leading sponsor, and we’ve all know at least one of those teachers who is more motivated by trophies than by actually teaching the kids something.  (I’m not saying trophies are bad either  – as we have our share of awards on our walls.)

But I can’t say that I would recommend Glee.  The show seems, like most shows about high school, to portray the drama and the worst elements of high school without showing off the best.  Where’s the dedicated teacher who spends extra hours tutoring, or the band teacher who motivates his kids to do better AND teaches them skills like self-discipline and dependability.  I think if I had to watch it every week, I’d quickly hate the constant cliches.

But I do imagine that some kids/teachers would enjoy it.  It does attempt to portray drama/choir kids in a more positive light.  At least they didn’t portray any yearbook scandals.

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